More and more clients are asking me to design baths that allow for greater accessibility and safety. People really do want to think ahead and plan for the day when everyday tasks become much harder, or when an aging parent comes to live with them. Even the most able-bodied among us can be stricken at any time with a broken leg, a debilitating illness or any variety of unforeseen circumstances.

Having a home you can live in comfortably and safely as you age, or through bouts of illness, injury, or disability, is very important. You may have heard the term “Universal Design.” Universal design simply means designing for all ages and abilities. It includes features like curbless showers, wider doorways, grab bars, taller toilets and wall-mounted sinks, among other things.

Fortunately, there is no reason for an accessible bath to look anything other than beautiful. Hand showers, bench seats and grab bars can be a very attractive part of the overall design. Here are some features to consider when planning your bath.

Wider doorways:
Standard interior doors are 30- 32 inches wide, but universal access requires 32 inches of clear space when the door is open. This allows enough space for a walker or a wheelchair. Remember, the door itself takes up space, so make sure the clear opening itself is at least 32”. It’s best if the door swings outward, rather than into the bathroom, but this is not always possible or practical, especially if the bathroom is located in a narrow hallway. If there is space, consider a pocket door, then there is no door swing at all to contend with.

Grab bars:
Some clients ask me for these, and others don’t want to admit they may need them someday. Even if you don’t think you want grab bars right now, ask your contractor to frame the walls surrounding the bathtub, in the shower and around the toilet with enough studs so that you can install them later. But why not just have them installed now? You might really appreciate it after a particularly intense workout, or a twisted ankle, or a nasty flu. And they are also great for hanging wet bathing suits! And fortunately, manufacturers have figured out that people don’t want their baths to look like a hospital, so there are many attractive styles to choose from.

 

Curbless showers:
Curbless showers are flush with the rest of the bathroom floor, so people using wheelchairs or other mobility devices have no trouble entering and exiting the shower. The shower floor is sloped toward the drain, and a glass shower enclosure or a long shower curtain can help keep the water contained. It costs a bit more in labor to install a curbless shower, as there is extra work involved. But in terms of accessibility, it is worth it.

Hand-held shower heads: 
These can be very handy for a variety of reasons, not just for accessibility. Many people like them because it makes it easier to clean a tub or shower; others like them because it makes it more convenient for bathing children or pets. And, in instances where one spouse is much taller than the other, a hand shower on a slide bar allows each partner to adjust the height of the shower head as needed.

Bench seats in the shower:
Again, these can be handy for a number of reasons. Women like them because it’s easier to shave their legs; they also provide an extra surface for shampoo and other toiletries. If your shower space is limited, a corner bench seat can be useful without taking up a lot of space. Or, you might decide it’s best to leave the entire shower clear, and plan to bring in a portable shower seat if it’s ever needed.

 

Taller toilets:
You may have noticed that toilets are getting taller. The old standard was 14-16” in height, while the new toilets are about 18” in height, which is chair height. Most people prefer this new height, as it is much easier to get up and down. Grab bars next to the toilet are also a good idea for a little extra help.

Wall-mounted sinks:
If you do need to accommodate a wheelchair, then a wall-mounted sink is ideal. With a wall-mounted sink, the person can wheel herself close to the sink and be able to use it easily. You forgo the storage that comes with a traditional vanity cabinet, but there are other ways to incorporate storage in the bath, and with the floor clear, cleaning is much easier.

Other safety concerns:
Make sure the flooring material is non-slip. Use tiles with a matte finish, sheet vinyl, or waterproof laminate. For lighting, add a recessed light in the shower, and consider a motion sensor night light for late-night bathroom visits.

There is no reason your beautiful bath can’t also be safe and functional.

These clients had an underutilized upstairs bedroom, outfitted with a small desk, a loveseat, and a TV in the closet. They challenged me to create a space where they all could be together, helping their young son with homework, surfing the internet, reading, and watching television. On their wish list: a large TV and comfortable seating area, two separate work spaces, ample storage for books and miscellaneous items, better lighting, and a space for a small microwave so they could heat up a cup of tea without having to go all the way downstairs. And, of course, make it attractive.

To make room for the large, custom U-shaped desk I designed, we removed the closet at the end of the room. The new desk features a work space at each end, with a long countertop, wall-to-wall upper and lower cabinets, and open shelves. In the center, we installed a large TV, and, while the microwave is not shown in the photo, notice the outlet in the right corner— that’s where it will go. And speaking of outlets, you’ll notice several new ones, both above and below the desk. This makes charging devices easy and convenient.

Their son’s workspace has an easy-to-reach book display, with drawers and cabinets for his school supplies. Both work spaces have their own desk light. The closed cabinets keep everything nearby but out of sight, while the open shelves provide display space.

My client loves the color orange, a friendly and energetic color (which is fitting, because she is also very friendly and energetic!), so you’ll see it distributed around the room. The accent wall is painted in a color called Winter Sunset by Kelly Moore. I absolutely love the double pocket doors also painted Winter Sunset. We widened the opening to the new den, and replaced the standard bedroom door with contemporary frosted glass French doors. This brings in more light, and adds a lot of personality. The doors are one of my favorite elements in this room.

The wall behind the new sofa is clad in wood planks, for texture and warmth. The wood wall coordinates with the wood shelves in the desk area, and the wood-look laminate countertop.

We kept the existing recessed can lighting, but added a contemporary track fixture, the individual desk lamps, and a wall-mounted reading light. Each on separate switches for maximum flexibility, the homeowners can now choose to have dimmer lighting for nighttime TV viewing, or lots of light for homework, bill-paying, and other projects.

With room for everyone, this inviting multi-purpose room has become a favorite hang-out spot for the whole family.

As long as I could remember, blue has been my favorite color. I love all shades of blue, but in particular, I love deep, intense blues like navy, royal, and cobalt. Blue is an amazingly versatile color, perhaps because it is the color of the sky and the ocean, which coordinate with just about every other color around. Throw on a pair of blue jeans, and you can wear any color top with them. So imagine my delight when the Pantone Color Institute, a very influential company in the world of color and design, selected Classic Blue as the color of the year for 2020.

In color psychology, blue is the color of stability, order, and reliability. It exudes feelings of serenity, calmness, and tranquility. An intense color like Classic Blue, however, can also evoke feelings of energy and strength. Blue is described as a favorite color by most people. In selecting the color of the year, Pantone and other color forecasters look thoughtfully at global societal influences such as art, media, entertainment, socioeconomic and political conditions, travel destinations and technology.

According to the folks at Pantone, “We are on the precipice of entering into a new decade and are desirous of a stable and strong foundation to help us go forward. Yet at the same time, many around the world are feeling unsure and as though the ground beneath them is continually in flux. Pantone 19-4052 Classic Blue, a solid and dependable blue hue, expresses trust, faith and constancy, as well as offering protection—qualities that provide us with the reassuring presence and feelings of calm and confidence we crave as we cross the threshold into this new era.”

Maybe it’s the feeling of strength and stability, or maybe I just like the color. But whatever the reason, I have blue running throughout my own house, and have also used it in a few of my design projects. The selection of Classic Blue as color of the year means you will be seeing it all over the place; in fabrics, wallpaper, home furnishings, clothing, even in consumer goods like electronics and appliances. If you like blue as much as I do, consider using it in your home as well.

For some, Classic Blue will be too intense to use as a wall color, but I challenge you to try it. Note the bedroom that features Navy as an accent wall behind the bed. And take a look at my headshot on the “About” page of this website— notice the blue wall behind me? That’s actually my own kitchen! I had it painted several years ago, and I still love it!. I also have Cobalt Blue glass tiles on my kitchen backsplash— in 15 years I have never gotten tired of them. I recently added some smoky blue glass tiles to my fireplace, and I love those too.

Another way to bring in deep, rich blue would on your countertops. Search on Google for a Cambria Quartz countertop called Hadley. Hadley is a gorgeous Navy Blue— I have not used it in a project yet, but I am dying to. Bala Blue is a brighter, more fun and energetic blue, shown in the bathroom photo below.

For many people, it will feel more comfortable to use Classic Blue in smaller doses. Try pillows, or an area rug, or a new sofa or chair. Or look for bedding, draperies or artwork. Blue is a classic color that does not go out of style; a versatile color that works equally well in traditional, transitional and contemporary styles.

My husband and I recently returned from a long-awaited vacation to New Zealand to celebrate our 30-year wedding anniversary (yes—the scenery really is as spectacular as you imagine!) We stayed in four different hotels over the 12 days, and the designer in me couldn’t help but notice not only the room decor, but also the amenities provided to make us feel comfortable. Many of you will be hosting guests over the upcoming holiday season, and there also may even be some of you offering rooms in your home as Airbnbs. In this column, I thought I’d share some observations and ideas to prepare your home for guests. And I’ve provided a few shopping links below as well.
 

At the bedside

  • USB outlets on the nightstands. A really nice touch is to provide a charging station for cell phones and tablets. In one of our hotel rooms we had a small USB powerstrip right on the nightstand so we could have our phones nearby. As an alternative, check out the table lamps that have USB ports built in to the lamp base. This is a great idea, and one I’ve used in many bedroom design projects.
  • Water. Such a simple thing, but it was so nice to have a water bottle and a glass on each bedside table. It’s effortless for you, but a very welcome touch for your guests.
  • Reading lights. This can be in the form of table lamps or wall mounted lights. In many homes I go to, there is a ceiling light in the bedroom, but no table lamps. Your guests will thank you for providing additional lighting!

In the bathroom

Inevitably, guests forget one or two toiletry items, so, besides the obvious shampoo and soap, it’s nice to keep a basket or drawer in the bathroom for cotton balls, makeup remover, toothpaste, hand lotion. You might also consider a hairdryer, sunscreen,  shaving cream, a few bandaids, a nail file. Guests can sometimes feel shy about asking, so think ahead about things your guests might need. 

For the suitcase

Provide a bench at the end of the bed or a luggage rack for suitcases; living out of a suitcase can be uncomfortable enough, but having it on the floor and tripping over it makes it tougher. Also, make sure there are several hangers in the closet, and, ideally, a drawer or two, so guests can unpack some of their things and feel more comfortable.
 

Other comforts

  • One hotel provided robes and slippers to us. So nice!
  • Another hotel included an extra blanket in the closet so we didn’t have to call down to the front desk. 
  • A small thing, but I love when hotels provide a plastic bag for dirty laundry.
  • Offer a basket of snacks, an electric tea kettle and some tea bags, or a Keurig coffee maker, so guests can help themselves.
Of course, a comfortable bed is key! Nice linens, good quality pillows, and a pretty presentation will make for very happy guests. 
 

Some shopping links:

 
 
 
Interior design is an art as well as a science, encompassing so much more than the visible, tangible items in the room, such as the sofa, the lamp and the drapes. Those items are important components to the finished room, of course, but there is so much more to it. Before the designer can get to selecting those items, he or she must step back, evaluate the entire space, and consider the seven guiding interior design elements to create an cohesive, harmonious space that is both functional and beautiful. Let’s look at each of the seven elements in a little more detail.
  1. SPACE
    Space refers to the physical boundaries of a room. The designer must be very aware of the space available, both the two-dimensional floor space, but also the three-dimensional volume in the room. The designer must find a way to use existing space to his or her advantage. In a long, rectangular room, for example, the best use of space might be to divide it into two distinct living areas: one for TV watching and another for working from home. A area containing furniture and décor items is a “positive space,” while an empty spot is referred to as a “negative space.” The negative space can often be as important as the positive space, as it gives the eye a place to rest, and brings other elements into focus. 
  1. LINES
    Lines are generally categorized into three types – horizontal, vertical and dynamic. Think table tops, shelves for horizontal lines; windows, doorways and tall fireplace chimneys for vertical lines. Dynamic lines might be an angled ceiling, a curved wall, or an arched doorway. Interior designers know to use a combination of lines is when selecting the selecting the items, or “forms” that will adorn the space.
  2. FORM
    The term “form” is used interchangeably with “shape” (and is also closely related to line).  A form can have straight, angular lines, or be more “organic” or curvy. Forms can also be categorized as open (think of a birdcage light fixture that you can see through) or closed (for example, a solid ceramic table lamp base). Designers combine forms and lines to maximum effect in a space. For example, a long table in a rectangular dining room fits well. A similarly rectangular light fixture can provide nice repetition of lines, but a trio of round pendant fixtures above the table instead will provide an interesting contrast and sense of balance. Either would be an appropriate choice; the key is to combine and balance the elements.

  3. LIGHT
    Light is absolutely key in interior design. Generally speaking, a room needs three types of lighting: Ambient, task, and accent. Ambient lighting illuminates the entire space (think recessed can lighting); task lighting could be a bedside or desk lamp; and accent lighting is the “dazzle” in the room that provides the beauty and character. Examples: a crystal chandelier, or pendant lights above your kitchen island.
  4. COLOR
    Color has the power to create many desired effects in a space. It can make a small room look larger and a large room look more cozy. It can create a sense of calm, or inject some drama into the space. Colors have values and intensities, and color schemes can be monochromatic, harmonious, or complementary. Designers combine colors to achieve their desired goals.
  5. TEXTURE
    Texture describes how typical surface looks and feels. Think of polished granite versus concrete; velvet versus silk. Texture adds depth and dimension into a space, and a variety of textures makes a room more interesting. A sleek glass-topped table, atop a shaggy area rug, combined with a velvet chair will look more interesting than a room where everything is the same.
  6. PATTERN
    A room always needs a bit of pattern to add interest. Pattern can be linear/geometric (think about a subway tile backsplash, or a striped wallpaper) or curvy/organic (think paisley or florals, or even animal print). Patterns can be subtle or dramatic, and often a little goes a long way. A mixture of geometric and organic patterns is best for creating a cohesive interior design. 
Successful interior designs are achieved because of careful consideration of these seven elements. 

As regular readers of this column know, I design baths and kitchens for a living. By now, although it’s hard to come up with an exact figure, the number of baths and kitchens I’ve worked on is well into the triple digits. Over the years, the state of California has tightened up requirements on what is deemed acceptable for residential construction, particularly in the areas of water and electricity usage. This directly impacts the fixtures that can be used in remodeling. In this column, I’d like to offer you some rules to follow when planning your own bath remodel. (A similar column for kitchen guidelines will come at a later date.)

First, understand that most bath remodels do require city building permits. The only time you might not need a permit is if you’re replacing your toilet or sink (as long as you’re not changing the location of those items.)

Each city is a little different, but all cities must abide by state building codes. According to the Fremont Building Department, “A permit is required for bathroom remodels that include the replacement of the tub/shower enclosure, relocation of plumbing fixtures or cabinets, or if additional plumbing fixtures will be installed. A permit is not required for replacement of plumbing fixtures (sink or toilet) in the same location. Plans shall be required if walls are removed, added, altered, and/or if any fixtures are removed, added or relocated.”

When selecting plumbing fixtures, keep these rules in mind. In your shower, the shower head must have a water flow of less than two gallons per minute (gpm). You are allowed to have two shower heads (such as a main shower head and a separate hand-held shower) but if you want to be able to have them both on at the same time, the total water flow rate for both shower heads cannot exceed this same two gpm requirement. Since it is difficult to find showerheads with a flow rate of less than 1 gpm, in reality, what this means is that the plumbing needs to be designed so you can use your main shower head OR your hand shower, but not both at the same time.

Speaking of showers, the minimum size for your shower pan is 30” x 30” inside the curb. Many baths are very tiny, but the shower pan must meet this size requirement to meet code.

Sink faucets must have a flow rate of 1.5 gpm or less, and toilets must have a gallons-per-flush rate of 1.28 or less. The minimum space required around a toilet is 30”. Starting at the center of the toilet, there must be 15” on each side of it, and 24” of clear space in front of it. More is better, but this is the minimum requirement.

All lighting fixtures must be considered “high efficacy” lighting, which translates to LED or fluorescent. Unfortunately, using screw-in LED light bulbs in a regular incandescent fixture will not pass code, but you can use a vacancy sensor switch in this case. This is a special light switch that you turn on manually, but that turns itself off if you forget to, 30 minutes after you leave the bathroom.

There are other code requirements to know about, but these are the ones I get asked about most commonly. The full set of building codes is available at the city planning department and online, which will help you plan for a successful project.

If you’ve been paying attention, you have probably noticed an immensely popular design trend called “Rustic Modern” all around us. It involves combining clean, modern lines with more rustic, earthy, organic elements. What do I mean by rustic elements? Examples are reclaimed wood beams, or distressed wood floors, or chunky, hand-crafted furniture. In my mind, rustic means it’s got some history to it; maybe the item is handed down from grandparents, or repurposed from an old building, or, as happens today, a brand new item is made to look old. While I love modern spaces, with their minimalistic decor and smooth, simple lines, sometimes they can appear sterile and unwelcoming. Adding rustic elements helps make modern decor look more friendly and approachable.
 
In my daughter’s apartment, she combined a hand-me-down oak dining table with contemporary white and chrome dining chairs. A client of mine paired an burl wood coffee table, kept for sentimental reasons, with a mid-century modern sofa. The result is a room filled with warmth and personality, as well as a sense of history.
 
This design trend is really about contrasting textures— think rough and smooth, honed and polished, rustic and refined.
 

Consider these suggestions when planning your own interior design projects:

  1. For cabinetry, keep perimeter cabinets clean-lined and modern— perhaps Shaker style, or slab-front doors and drawers— but give your island some character by making out of knotty alder, or distressed oak. 


    2. If your house has exposed beams, consider wrapping them in reclaimed wood planks. Keep the walls smooth and simple, but repeat the distressed look with wood floors.


    3. Mix textures by topping a rustic bath vanity or kitchen island with polished, refined quartz or granite countertop. Use shiny chrome fixtures. Or, try the reverse— rustic bronze fixtures on a crisp white countertop and modern cabinetry. 


    4. Use a farmhouse sink in an otherwise contemporary kitchen.


    5. Select unique and interesting light fixtures. There are so many to choose from nowadays; In a dining room, install a very modern fixture above a farmhouse trestle table. Or how about wall-mounted lantern lights in a contemporary living room? Note the pendant lights and barstools in the kitchen photo; the bronze iron trim and old-looking Edison light bulb, along with the reclaimed wood on the stools, provide rustic elements to an otherwise contemporary kitchen.


    6. Use wood planks, or even bricks or stone, on a wall to create an amazing focal point in a room. How about installing wood plank porcelain tiles in a shower?

I don’t see this trend leaving us anytime soon, but, in my opinion, as with all interior design, subtle and understated is much better than being hit over the head with it. In general, aim to keep things simple, by incorporating just a few rustic elements into your contemporary decor, or vice versa. Doing too much of one thing can quickly take a room from elegant to over-the-top. Adopting a “less is more” philosophy is usually your best bet.

Recently, my husband and I traveled to Florida to visit our son. We splurged on a nice hotel, with a room overlooking the beautiful Atlantic ocean. The view was indeed beautiful, but the bathroom, however, while attractive to look at, was very poorly designed. I design bathrooms for a living, and have certainly learned a few things along the way about the battle between form and function. In my opinion, this bath was a glaring example of what happens when form wins out over function. The result was a bathroom that was very impractical, awkward, and uncomfortable to use. 

If you’re embarking on a bath remodel this year, here are some things to consider so you don’t make the same mistakes as the designer of this hotel bathroom. 

THE TUB/SHOWER PROBLEM:

Our hotel bathroom featured a huge soaking tub that was also the shower. At first glance, it looked very inviting. But as I tried to use it, there were some issues. Soaking tubs are very deep— about 20” in height on average, and some are even taller. This makes getting in and out of them difficult for some people (especially for someone like me, who is only 5 feet tall.) For many people, lifting a leg this high off the ground to get in and out is tough. This tub had a ledge to sit on, but it was very wide (about 9”), and tall, and there were nothing to hold on to, like a grab bar, for example, to help lift myself over and into the tub. I am able-bodied and physically fit, but for anyone with any physical limitations at all (like my height), this would be a very difficult situation. My husband’s assessment: “If you are comfortable stepping over a saw-horse and into a deep hole, then this kind of tub is for you.” 

 

SOLUTION:

If you’re considering a deep soaking tub, please be aware of this height issue, and think about how you will be getting in and out of it. At the very least, install a grab bar nearby— everyone will benefit from that at some point. Ideally, a soaking tub separate from the shower is the best scenario, but many bathrooms are not large enough to accommodate both. In many bathrooms I work on, people are forgoing the tub altogether, preferring a large walk-in shower instead. 

PRIVACY PROBLEM:

Another design element that made this bathroom awkward (even for a married couple like us) was that the wall separating the tub and vanity area from the bedroom area was made entirely of clear glass. There was no privacy at all. Anyone in the shower was on full display on the bedroom side. This might not bother some people, but I’m guessing that most folks prefer a bit of privacy. 

SOLUTION:

While this wall of glass was indeed attractive-looking, a simple solution would be to install a window covering on the bedroom side, which could be lowered when privacy is desired. 

THE SINK PROBLEM:

The designer of that bath thought a tall vessel sink would look nice, and I agree that it did. However, the vessel sink was installed on a standard height vanity cabinet, so the sink was much too high off the ground. The edge of the sink was literally up to my chest, which made for a very awkward experience brushing my teeth. 

SOLUTION:

To accommodate a vessel sink, the cabinet must be made shorter to make up for the height of the sink. If your vessel sink is four inches tall, for example, the vanity should be no more than 32” in height. Unless you are very tall, aim for a finished height of no more than 36” for the sink and the cabinet. If you are short like me, a finished height of 34” might be more comfortable. 

There were other issues also, such as no towel bars at all near the shower or the sink, terrible lighting, and glossy, slippery tiles on the floor. But on the upside, this bathroom provided the topic for this month’s column!

The most rewarding part of designing kitchens is customizing the design to fit the individual needs of each client. Interior design is about creating beautiful spaces, certainly. But more importantly, it is about creating spaces that work well and improve the quality of life of the clients. The kitchen is truly the heart of the home, so why not create yours to be as personal as possible? Why not include some special features?

At the start of each project, I spend a good amount of time talking to the clients. I ask them to tell me what works and what doesn’t work; what they like and what they don’t like about their current kitchen.

In my designs, not only do I tackle the most common complaints about not enough storage and not enough counter space, often I am also given wish lists of very personal touches that I need to incorporate. In one kitchen, for example, the client had a beautiful handmade wooden cutting board she wanted to display. So we designed the island specifically so she could have this important wish list item. This client is an avid quilter who often hosts quilting sessions in the large adjacent dining space. Just for her, the island also features bookshelves to house her quilting books, and cabinets for supplies that are easily accessible from the workspace.

Another client wanted to incorporate a prayer corner in her kitchen— she described to me what she wanted to display there, and we designed her cabinets accordingly. She wanted a combination of open shelves and glass cabinets, so she could display and store her religious items. I was happy to oblige.

In another project, the homeowner had a set of beautiful leaded glass panels from her original kitchen that she really wanted to incorporate into her new kitchen. She got her wish with a custom-designed cabinet made to fit these panels.

Many clients ask for serving areas, wine bars, and small work spaces for laptops. Others ask for special cabinets for pet food, designated drawers for phone chargers and bookshelves for favorite cookbooks. One avid baker I worked with asked for an island topped with a marble slab, knowing that is the preferred surface for baking. Knowing yourself and how you use your kitchen helps me design it specially for you.

One project currently under construction is a kitchen designed for a client who loves everything French, and travels to France once a year. She asked me to design a “French-inspired” kitchen just for her. When it is complete, this kitchen will feature Toile wallpaper, a lovely French chandelier, marble-look quartz counters (more practical than real marble), and dark hardwood floors. She’s excited and so am I— I will share the photos when we are done!

This bath project was a pleasure to design— it’s a spectacular blend of form and function, delivered with a punch of vibrant color, and an interesting mix of textures. I work with and appreciate all design styles, but my favorite style is modern. I love the clean lines and simple, minimalistic aesthetic. Modern design allows the freedom to combine colors and materials like these— hand-maid glossy ceramic tiles in vibrant teal, wood-look porcelain in warm brown, and stark white quartz.

Before the remodel, this master bath was very tiny, as so many baths in Fremont seem to be! We borrowed a couple of feet from the master bedroom and expanded into the hallway linen closet to create this new larger space. Besides its new size, here’s a list of what really makes this bath unique and special:

The vanity

The wall-to-wall vanity provides ample storage for both spouses— each has his and her own set of wide drawers, with a common space in the center below the sink. This couple decided on a large trough sink instead of two individual sinks; this gave them more counter space. The wall-mounted faucet keeps the countertop clear. We installed lighting below the floating vanity, used for accent, but also as a night light. The custom-made cabinet is made of cherry wood, with the grain running horizontally. To break up all the angles, I purposely chose a large round mirror.

The tile

The client chose the gorgeous hand-made ceramic tile from Heath Ceramics. I opted to run the subway tile vertically rather than horizontally to break up all the horizontal lines, and also to draw the eye up to the skylight in the ceiling. The entire bathroom floor and shower wall are tiled in wood-look porcelain, giving the illusion of more space. The brown of the wood plank tile also balances the brown color on the other side of the bathroom.
I really love the high contrast of the teal with the brown.

The shower

The large ceiling-mounted rain shower head, along with the hand-held shower head are pure luxury. And please note that we intentionally placed the valve on the right side wall, which is the entry point of the shower— that way, the clients only need to reach in to turn on the water instead of walk all the way into the shower. The two recessed niches provide storage, but also looks like modern art to me, with the juxtaposition of opposing colors, lines and shapes. The clear glass shower walls allow all the colors to be viewed with no obstructions.

The color scheme

Three colors— warm brown, vibrant teal, and crisp white are combined throughout. I was aiming for planes of color, again with a nod to modern art. I selected a matching teal paint color to use on the wall behind the toilet to continue the color from the tile, but all the other walls and ceiling are bright white like the countertop.

The result is a roomy, colorful, modern, stunning bath for two. I only wish it was my own bathroom!